About Us

Yes, it was a cold November back in 2013. I had quite a few drinks and I fell asleep while watching ‘Rambo’. When I woke up again i noticed the news on TV, with the eye that was open while the other was still closed. There seemed to be something going on in Kiev (Kyiv)… there is always something going on there, sadly rarely anything good.

Yanukovych’s Berkut police storm the Maidan Square a week after the peaceful protest started. Photo from 29 November 2013

So I got me a Coke and some popcorn to follow closer what’s going on there, since I was living together with two girls from Odesa. It turned out some people were mad about the cancellation of a planned association agreement with the EU. EU? Who cares, i thought. So I turned the TV off and went to bed. I had lots of work the following days and did not care for a while.

Ukrainians praying for peace on the Maidan. Photo from 1 December 2013

A week later I was watching my favorite TV show, Miami Vice, almost sadism to watch concerning the fact how cold it was outside. Ha! The news again. Will these ukies ever stop complaining? But what’s this? Riots? Shooting? People screaming and lying in the streets? This was not the usual show most Ukrainians already got used to since 2003, this was something else.

Euromaidan revolution, Kyiv Ukraine, February 2014

So I dived onto my sofa and grabbed my laptop to find out what’s happening. What better place to check than Tymoshenko’s website. Had been a fan ten years earlier, so I went online.

Sadly most posts were in Ukrainian. Neither I nor my girls spoke any Ukrainian. I only knew Yugoslavian and they knew only Russian. But there was Google Translate. So I finally got a view of what was happening and able to respond, more or less.

So I was following the situation for a while. When somebody posted that government buildings were stormed, I got concerned. I argued that Russian tanks could be rolling soon, but most thought I was an idiot.

Euromaidan protest. Photo from 28 January 2014

Meanwhile Mister president packed his suitcase full of stolen money and detached his golden toilet, while confidential documents were burning in the oven, to catch his chopper to Rostov in Russia.

Shortly later my darkest fears were confirmed and the unthinkable became reality. Russian troops were moving into Ukraine. They moved out of their leased bases, not having any insignias, wearing black face masks or black socks with holes.

Russian “Little Green Men” invading Ukraine. March 2014

The invasion of Ukraine began. The Ukrainian army in Crimea did what until then was rather a french tradition, they were waving white flags. I didn’t understand. Was there a deal? Weird.

I was busy again for a while. Larisa decided to visit her ex-husband and child in Shyrokyne, eastern Ukraine. I was against, but she said all is safe, the war is in Crimea.

I didn’t follow the situation any further and got busy with my work again.

One day the phone rang. Annoying since I was constipated and on the pot, and the bell came just seconds before a possible moment of relief. I was pissed off and preparing to shitstorm the muthafucker calling.

I picked up the phone and someone was screaming into the phone “They killed them! They killed them!” and crying like a hysterical psycho. Turned out it was Larisa (name changed), one of my girls. When she calmed down she told me that her only child and ex-husband died when the Russians attacked their village. Was there a war? Did I miss something? Why she never told me? Or did she think I already knew?

The tiny KGB leader of the invasions in Ukraine

After Larisa came back I decided to get informed better. Since Tymoshenko’s site was offline I had to look for a new source. I ended up with a site named ‘Ukraine Today’.


So, although not a full insider, I made my first comment. I can’t recall the comment, but it was about the Crimea and that I had no problem if it was Russia now. I got shitstormed by dozens of users and my comment was deleted instantly. I didn’t know what the hell I did wrong, just said what I thought.

Anyway, I came back to the site and continued to comment. Not that anybody would have upvoted or responded. It was clear they were watching me.

Suddenly an upvote. I can’t recall the user’s name, but I felt flattered. Not easy for a guy like me to get an upvote. And suddenly more upvotes. Until someone wrote that I got upvoted by a troll. Two guys named Murf and Gizmo seemed to like me, and I began to like them too. After a while I was more accepted. Guys with fancy names like RedSquareMaidan, Dmitry Pisskopf, Angel and Putin Hitler began to upvote me regularly, some even responded to me.

I later lost my job, and the girls had to pay my bills. I got depressed. But there were still these crazy guys from that Ukrainian website. So I got me some wine and pizza, going online to fight the Russian invaders. ‘Stop ATO’ the trolls were posting. ATO stood for Anti-terrorist Operation. The trolls started to insult and impersonate me. I got pissed off and attacked any of the assholes that were out there. Putin Hitler and a dutch guy named Willem became my first supporters. For months we met in the evenings to slaughter trolls. Angel’s profile got banned and he became Clown then, who later became my best friend, followed by Pisskopf.

We all grew together like a digital army, with myself and Clown in front. We drank, we laughed, we trashed one troll after another.

Later Larisa joined us. She was insulted by trolls instantly. She got hurt… and angry. She got accepted quickly. Suzanna followed later. I made many new friends, like Focusser, OnlyFactsPlease, Knut, Toronto Tonto, Scradje, Vasyl, Meow, and many more. For years we were fighting a forgotten war against trolls, lies and propaganda from Russia. Some of the best times I had.

One day Ukraine Today announced it will go offline. Everybody said it was a great time and that it’s all over. I was heartbroken. Then Larisa surprised me with a new site, Ukraine Today USA. I told everybody about it, hoping people would migrate to it.

Then Focusser, we were already buddies, said he wants to join as an author. So we decided to post articles. It didn’t take too long until the site was hacked and went down.

So we designed a new site, Ukraine Today. Everybody migrated quickly. It became an awesome success. We had the fun of our lives. Booze, puke, pregnancies, venezuelan hookers, moderators banning themselves… and news from Ukraine. Disqus then decided after two successful years and a record in followers, to shut us down.

Was this the end?

Nope. One of our guys, RedSquareMaidan, rescued us. He bought this current site and domain for us, for $190, so we can continue to exist as a news source and community. Thanks!

Thanks to ya all, folks! And never forget – the Crimea is NOT Russia! 😂

© Mike from Ukraine Today .org 2020

For more information on the origins of Ukraine Today click here:

https://www.csmonitor.com/World/Europe/2014/0825/Ukraine-Today-jumps-into-the-Ukraine-Russia-media-war

Below is a timeline of events from the Euromaidan revolution from 2013 which started the first Ukraine Today. Ukraine Today was originally named to respond to the gush of vile propaganda spewing from the Kremlin outlet, Russia Today. Now simply called RT.

Thanks for reading, here is the timeline and videos from the Maidan revolution. Please remember to LIKE and FOLLOW us here on Ukraine Today .org, and also check out or articles on Facebook and Twitter. Any comments or questions please feel free to jump into our forum anytime!

Slava Ukraini~~!!

1. On the evening of November 21, 2013, journalist (and now Ukrainian parliamentarian) Mustafa Nayyem used Facebook to call on people to come to the Maidan and protest. This was the start of the revolution.
3. On December 1, the protests turned into a massive gathering in the city center. The rally turned into a revolution.
2. The violent dispersal of peaceful student protesters on Maidan Square on November 30, 2013, enraged the public, which began to actively gather for protests against the President Viktor Yanukovych’s regime.
4. This is what a typical day of peaceful protest looked like on December 8, 2013: the pro-Maidan rally, the anti-Maidan rally, and the fall of the statue of Lenin.

5. As the protests dragged on, participants set up camp along Kyiv’s central avenue to shelter themselves from the harsh Ukrainian winter weather. This Hromadske video shows a confrontation between protesters and police in the center of Kyiv near protest encampments.
6. Protesters barricaded the center of Kyiv to ward off any advancing police activity. On December 11, 2013, Interior Ministry troops began an attack in order to “beautify the area,” dismantle the barricades and disperse the protesters. The attack was only semi-successful: the troops broke through some of the barricades and eventually managed to gain some ground into the Maidan protest camp, but they failed to break into the occupied Kyiv City Hall and the Trade Unions Building. The protest continued for several months after this.
7. In January 2014, the first killings occurred during a protest against the so-called “Dictatorial Laws” restricting public protest passed by the Ukrainian Parliament. Protesters Serhiy Nigoyan and Mikhail Zhyznewski were shot dead by police during this protest rally. They were the first deaths of the Maidan Revolution.
8. During Ukraine’s EuroMaidan protests, a piano was set up near a line of Berkut, a regiment of police special forces. While protesters played the piano, police blasted back their own recorded music. The atmosphere between the two groups was tense.
9. February 18-20, 2014, are known as the bloodiest days of the Maidan protest. Over the course of three days, 73 civilians and 11 law enforcement officers were killed during clashes between police and protesters in Kyiv’s city center.  Police forces stand accused of illegally bearing arms against civilians protesting President Viktor Yanukovych, whose draconian anti-protest laws further agitated the confrontation. The protesters who were killed during Euromaidan are referred to as the “Nebesna Sotnia” (Heavenly Hundred).
10. Hromadske interviewed many friends and family members of protesters who were killed during the Maidan protests. Volodymyr Bondarchuk spoke with Hromadske about his father, Serhiy, a physics teacher from western Ukraine who traveled to Kyiv to join the EuroMaidan demonstrations.

2 comments

  • Special thanks to Mike for his moving, personal story and to Foccusser for the epic Maidan videos. Ukraine Today .org is the third version of this service and it will continue to tell the truth about Ukraine until the invading Russians end their illegal invasions and occupations, and their associated propaganda, lies, theft, rape, torture and murder.
    Slava Ukraini~~!!

    Liked by 3 people

  • Летающий Киви

    Thanks for telling your story. I too have been following this from the beginning, first on Kyiv Post then through your various sites. Keep up the good work, Slava Ukraine.

    Like

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