Russia Spending an Estimated $900 Million a Day on Ukraine War

As Russia continues its invasion in Ukraine, the heavy toll taken by Russia’s economy could be felt for years to come.

Russia’s invasion is now in its third month, and sustaining the military offensive requires approximately $900 million a day, Sean Spoonts, editor-in-chief of SOFREP, a media outlet focused on military newstold Newsweek.

Several factors play into that heavy price, according to SOFREP’s estimate. That includes paying the Russian soldiers who are fighting in Ukraine; providing them with munitions, bullets and rockets; and the cost to repair lost or damaged military equipment. Russia also must pay for the thousands of critical weapons and cruise missiles that have been fired during the war, which run about $1.5 million apiece, according to Spoonts.

Those figures don’t take into consideration how much Russia may have lost financially because of the severe economic sanctions imposed on it after launching the invasion in late February. Those sanctions may remain in place even if Russia withdraws its troops, according to the White House.

Many believed Russia would quickly rout Ukraine soon after the invasion, given its military superiority. However, Russia has not had much military success up to this point. Forces have failed to take control of the capital city of Kyiv and struggled in other major cities. Pentagon press secretary John Kirby has pointed out that every move by Russian forces has been met with strong resistance by the Ukrainians.

“All I can tell you is that the Russians have not made the kind of progress in the Donbas and the south that we believe they wanted to make. We do believe they’re behind schedule,” Kirby said.

Russia’s failures come at a great cost to Russia both financially and in terms of loss of life, although the Kremlin has been hesitant to release numbers about military casualties. A study released two weeks after Putin’s announcement found that direct losses from the war has cost Russia about $7 billion.

The economic sanctions imposed on the country as a result of their invasion has had devastating impacts on the country, likely to be felt by Russian citizens for decades to come, according to a March 14 report from CNBC.

The Russian economy could be set back by as much as 30 years as the Russian ruble has collapsed, according to CNBC’s report, with some believing that Russia’s standard of living could be lowered for the next five years.

The Institute for International Finance, a financial think-tank representing firms in over 70 countries, states that the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) will likely fall by 15 percent this year, according to Business Insider.

Ukraine also dealt a difficult blow to Russia in April with the sinking of the Moskva, a Russian warship and flagship of the navy, and an estimated $750 million loss, according to Forbes Ukraine.

The publication reported in April that Ukraine destroyed more than 5,000 pieces of Russian equipment since the war began, but that the Moskva was by far the most expensive target.

Despite the massive cost of weaponry, Kirby said there is evidence that Russian forces have not been hitting their intended targets with precision-guided missiles. He said a multitude of factors could be responsible, including possible incompetence on behalf of operators.

10 comments

  1. “The Russian economy could be set back by as much as 30 years as the Russian ruble has collapsed, according to CNBC’s report, with some believing that Russia’s standard of living could be lowered for the next five years.”

    Just think how low that will be when you see mafia land outside of Moscow and St. Petersburg, which are already living on African-level.

    “Despite the massive cost of weaponry, Kirby said there is evidence that Russian forces have not been hitting their intended targets with precision-guided missiles. He said a multitude of factors could be responsible, including possible incompetence on behalf of operators.”

    Either those operators are unqualified to run those weapons or those weapons are simply no precision-type munitions or the crews are totally drunk all the time. At any rate, keep up the bad work, mafia land!

    Liked by 5 people

    • But the rouble hasn’t collapsed. It’s running at 69 to the dollar. For a while it was in excess of 100; which is what you need to hurt the fucks.
      At the moment the sanctions are still pathetically feeble. The putinazi economy must be completely crushed.

      Liked by 5 people

        • Yes, but you cannot forget that mafia land has other obligations to consider and not only the military’s, despite the latter’s top priority in receiving funds. And, no one knows how much of the money flowing into mafia land gets soaked up by corruption, which is still alive and well there.

          Liked by 3 people

      • Yes, the sanctions could be tougher. However, as stated before, the current ruble “value” is kept at an artificially high level, relatively speaking. Mafia land has taken several measures to shore up their currency, but this is only effective temporarily and in truth only whitewashes the country’s deepening economic woes. Wells Fargo, one of the largest international banks, announced that the real exchange rate of the dollar in Russia is 180 rubles per dollar. This is more than three times higher than the official value of the currency in the Russian Federation.

        Liked by 3 people

        • I did not know that Wells Fargo info; good to know! Nevertheless, the sanctions are still nowhere near enough to force the 180° turn that is needed.
          I still think that the allies are not taking the putinazi threat seriously enough or acting quickly enough.
          At the moment the Ukrainians are having to defend from horrible cynical attacks against civilians and civilian infrastructure, which does not give them the scope to retake Kherson; an absolutely vital objective.
          One week ago the General Staff announced that the putinazis were shaping up to storm Krivy Rih and Mykolayiv.
          The defenders hit an enemy ammo store yesterday, not far from Mykolayiv.
          The allies must know that the fall of Mykolayiv and Ochakiv could mean the end of Ukraine. They need to get long range artillery in there now, plus much better anti aircraft and anti-missile systems.
          This is a critical time for Ukraine. If the heavy stuff had been fully operational and in theatre early enough, the whole of putler’s phase two would have been a blowout.
          The horror of Mariupol shows what the putinazis intend to do to Ukraine; given half a chance, but still Ukraine’s allies are not working hard or fast enough.
          After all the horror and still no air support? Shocking really.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Indeed, it almost seems as if most Western leaders are relying on Ukraine to defend the free world from this fascist, criminal country with minimal assistance. Maybe it’s cowardice, maybe it’s money, or just plain stupidity. I think it’s all three.

            Liked by 4 people

              • Israel gets at least $4bn/yr from the US. It is a tiny country with a much lower threat level than Ukraine.
                By that yardstick, Ukraine should be receiving at least $35bn/yr even during peacetime.
                The Budapest signatories are helping, but absolutely nowhere near enough. Apart from Poland and Pribaltika, the rest of the democracies are as stingy as fuck.

                Liked by 3 people

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