Yevhen Mahda: Biden-Putin simultaneous game session

If during the Cold War its participants understood the world as the Great Chessboard, today we can talk about a session of simultaneous play on several “boards” between Russia and the United States.

What is the reason?

Apparently, in the changing nature of international relations, in the transformation of the world into a multipolar 20 years ago. US dominance has not disappeared, but Russia significantly lacks the resources to compete with them on an equal footing. Other poles (China, the European Union, India) are trying to defend their interests no less actively, but the Kremlin presents itself as the most aggressive player. The whole world expects the results of the meeting of the presidents of the USA and Russia in Geneva, but now it is a game

Within March-April we saw significant pressure on Ukraine. The Ukrainian “board” is a stable priority for Russia, so the game here is on a grand scale. The only adequate response to Russia’s aggressive actions is rapprochement with NATO by reforming the Armed Forces and meeting the Alliance’s requirements. The refusal to receive the MAP this year should not be fatal in the issue of Ukraine’s Euro-Atlantic integration, because it is possible to win the confrontation with Russia only by changing the format of relations.

In Belarus, Russia plays white. The capture of Roman Protasevich and the final discrediting of the Alexander Lukashenko regime in the eyes of the EU confirm this. In the fall of 2021, Vladimir Putin needs a “small geopolitical victory” and drawing Belarus into its sphere of influence gives grounds to understand the vector of the Kremlin’s actions.

Another post-Soviet country, Armenia, appears to be under constant pressure from the Kremlin, which has only intensified since the fierce fighting in Nagorno-Karabakh in the autumn of 2020. However, Russia has failed to shake the position of Armenian Prime Minister Nikola Pashinyan, who retains the trust of his fellow citizens even after the country’s military defeat. Joseph Biden’s decision to recognize the Armenian genocide in the Ottoman Empire is an unexpected bonus for Pashinyan ahead of early parliamentary elections and a signal that Washington is closely monitoring the situation in the South Caucasus.

The rapid castling took place in the Czech Republic, which until recently was perceived as a completely loyal EU country to Russia. However, the results of the investigation of the explosions at ammunition depots in the autumn of 2014, where Russian intelligence was involved, led to the collapse of Czech-Russian relations and the gradual transformation of President Milos Zeman into an impassable pawn.

Russia is trying to score in the Balkans, where a change of government in Montenegro has led to a gradual curtailment of the country’s participation in NATO operations. There is no question of withdrawing from the Alliance, but some of Podgorica’s actions look illustrative and are cause for concern. Attempts to gain additional points on the Middle East chessboard due to the aggravation of relations between Israel and Palestine were stopped rather quickly.

The first board on the eve of the Biden-Putin summit was the completion of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline. The United States has decided to abandon abrupt steps, moving to a protective model. Russia, on the other hand, seems to be trying to push for the desired result, as if feeling the weakness of the enemy. However, Washington still has time to restructure its positions, and it may take place after the Biden-Putin summit.

The hysterical reaction of Ukrainian society to the situation with Nord Stream 2 is unduly. First, the United States has not yet taken its offensive steps, and second, Ukraine, which has been defending electricity imports from Russia and Belarus for two years, has given a bad signal to its partners.

However, Ukraine should not feel embarrassed due to its status as one of the chessboards of the global confrontation between the United States and Russia, but it is advisable to focus on the crystallization of national interests and the strengthening of foreign policy subjectivity. There are no other recipes in the modern world.

Yevhen Mahda is executive director of the Kyiv-based Institute of World Policy.

(c) KyivPost

10 comments

  • “First, the United States has not yet taken its offensive steps, and second, Ukraine, which has been defending electricity imports from Russia and Belarus for two years, has given a bad signal to its partners.”

    If Ukraine keep expecting support, they have to start at home. Allowing oligarchs to remain rich on Russian electric imports is criminal, and needs to stop immediately.

    Liked by 4 people

    • “The hysterical reaction of Ukrainian society to the situation with Nord Stream 2 is unduly. ”

      I have to take issue with this statement and I wonder if the writer considered the full impact of bypassing Ukraine with Moskali gas exports. I believe it does expose Ukraine to greater pressure from the rabid runts but it is also a huge chunk of the budget. “Hysterical”?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Agreed. Also : ‘the United States has not yet taken its offensive steps…’ would imply that the Biden administration still has further cards to play. I think they’ve already given putler the green light.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Its so terribly sad. The US has been unified around support for Ukraine and even after screwing up the response to the original invasion in 2014 Biden STILL goes along to get along. If the US starts waiving sanctions you can bet the rest of the spaghetti spines will too.

          Liked by 2 people

  • The article references Roman Protasevich. There is a concerted effort by kremkrapper media to place him as an operative of a Ukrainian nazi group.
    The NYT; a historic enemy of Ukraine and filthy Russia shill publication, backed this up. It is currently running an article claiming that Ukraine is under investigation (presumably by the Feds) for ‘election interference’ in 2016. Sick fucks.

    Liked by 5 people

      • What action might the EU take to help Roman and his Russian chick and how would they determine the forcefulness of that action? This is a putler-friendly shitshow that, like most of the world’s mainstream media and politicians, is happy to portray Donbas as a purely Ukrainian issue with Russia merely meeting its obligations to Russian people. They are all also falsely prepared to present the lie that east Ukraine is pro-Russia. The pricks might even believe it, so strong is the kremprop media effort.
        If they actually do come up with something really strong against Luka (unlikely), wouldn’t that send out the signal that Luka’s fascist boss is free to murder his neighbours, steal their land, lie about it and get clean away with it whilst Luka’s (relatively) minor crime is punished more severely?

        Liked by 3 people

  • onlyfactsplease

    “The first board on the eve of the Biden-Putin summit was the completion of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline. The United States has decided to abandon abrupt steps, moving to a protective model. Russia, on the other hand, seems to be trying to push for the desired result, as if feeling the weakness of the enemy. However, Washington still has time to restructure its positions, and it may take place after the Biden-Putin summit.”
    Weakness is the dull shimmering hallmark of the West, and, unfortunately, we are no exception. Three mediocre presidents in a row have left our foreign policy in shambles. Mafia land could have been put in its place years ago if we had had only one strong president and NSII would be dead in the water for good. I was hoping for a strong Congress and although it has proven better than our presidents, their performance also leaves a lot to be desired. It seems that no one has a real interest to put mafia land in the crosshair once and for all.

    Liked by 4 people

  • Putin gave 500 million dollars to Ex-President Lukashenko.

    Liked by 2 people

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