Senate passes 2021 defense bill with veto-proof majority, defying Trump’s threats

Trump has threatened to veto bill for not including a repeal Section 230

The GOP-led Senate overwhelmingly approved a $740 billion major national defense bill on Friday, defying President Trump‘s veto threats.

The final vote was 84-13 on the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), well beyond the two-thirds requirement to override a potential veto if Trump carried through on his threat to sink the legislation. 

“The Senate’s bipartisan passage of the NDAA shows that members on both sides of the aisle are committed to a strong national defense and to the protection of our women and men in uniform—regardless of petty veto threats from the outgoing president,” said Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill.

The House already approved the legislation with a veto-proof majority on Tuesday with a 335-to-78 vote as many Republicans broke with Trump in favor of maintaining a 60-year tradition of approving the annual defense legislation.

“Congress’ first duty is to provide for the common defense,” said Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wy. “The National Defense Authorization Act is how we keep America safe. For 60 consecutive years, Congress has passed this bill.”

The legislation will give U.S. troops 3% pay raises and now heads to Trump’s desk.

Trump has vowed to veto the bill unless lawmakers impose limits on social media companies he claims were biased against him during the election. Trump has also said he wants Congress to strip out a provision of the bill that allows renaming of military bases that now honor Confederate leaders.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., in a rare break with Trump, urged passage of the measure despite Trump’s threat to veto it. 

“This NDAA will unlock more than $740 billion for the training, tools and cutting-edge equipment that our service members and civilian employees need to defend American lives and American interests,” McConnell, said. “It will give our troops the 3% pay raise they deserve. It’ll keep our forces ready to deter China and stand strong in the Indo-Pacific.”

Trump tweeted Tuesday that he will veto “the very weak” defense bill unless it repeals Section 230, a part of the communications code that shields Twitter, Facebook and other tech giants from content liability.

Congress has never overridden one of Trump’s eight vetoes. Congress has only overridden the president 111 times in history.

Lawmakers hoped Trump would reconsider the veto-threat. 

“I think we can override the veto, if in fact he vetoes,” House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said Tuesday. “I hope he does not veto. I hope he reconsiders. And I think he will get substantial pressure (from Republicans) that, you know, you don’t want to put the defense bill at risk.″

Chad Pergram and the Associated Press contributed to this report. 

(c) Fox News

26 comments

  • Great news. Goodbye Nord stream II.

    Liked by 3 people

  • 3% more pay is great! God bless our serving men and women! 🇺🇸

    Liked by 3 people

  • Good news! Just in the nick of time. Nord Stream II is being continued again.
    Or, maybe we ought to let the mafiosi finish it and see their part of the pipe rust and crumble away.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thank God Biden and his cabinet of Commies won’t be able to cancel the sanctions for at least a year.

      Liked by 3 people

      • What makes you think they would do that.

        It weren’t Democrats that lifted sanctions on an Russian aluminium plant and Trump personally allowed to buy the Russian ventilators from a sanctioned company.

        There have never been used. And no, they weren’t free.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Trump wanted to veto this bill.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Yeah, just because Trump was all whiny because Twitter warned users for some of his misleading tweets.

            He wanted to punish them for this.

            In fact, the law that excludes tech forms from content liability is only in his favour, as Twitter is no longer legally obliged to warn users for disinformation, as they are no longer financially responsible for any potential damage.

            In this sense, I oppose the law too, but for the exact opposite reason Trump does. I think websites and social media should be responsible for all content, also so they can be sued for publishing Russian propaganda.

            Fortunately it probably doesn’t matter to much, as I don’t think there are many lawsuits waged against tech companies for this matter, but also, other countries in which tech companies operate, do not have similar provisions. So they still need to tackle disinformation and propaganda nonetheless.

            Like

            • There is far more to than that. The left is allowed to post disinformation on Twitter and others without being banned.

              Liked by 1 person

            • It was much more than a warning if you wanted to be honest. The story was completely censored for 2 weeks before the election and you know it. Even more than 10% of the Democrats said they would have changed their votes if they knew. I guess your news sites don’t give you both sides, that makes you a sheep. ;))

              Like

              • Well, I read about it on multiple websites, including your beloved Fox News. And it said Trump was whining about Twitter censoring his Tweets. And it was not a threat, he said he would do it. The only thing that prevented him from doing so, is that the bill was approved with a 2/3 majority, so a veto would be futile.

                There are no “both sides”, as there are no major differences on reporting on this issue (except for Fox News stating that a veto override is near to impossible, which it is not).

                You are calling me a sheep, but you clearly haven’t read anything else than Fox News. If you did, you would have notices that there were no major differences on reporting on this issue.

                Like

  • Erump just needs to realize he is a lame duck and conduct himself accordingly. play some golf. Hit the paid lecture circuit so fans will pay 150k to hear him babble and eat rubbery chicken. writ his self aggrandizing bio. and start building him presidential library.
    And basically realize he lost.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I would rather prepare for the shitload of lawsuits against him that are already in preparation, or try to move to another country. Maybe burn some papers as well.

      He won’t have an easy time once he leaves office.

      Instead he does things that will not help him later, such pardoning pro-Russian criminals such as Stone and Flynn. Let’s bet on a virtual bottle of wine that he will pardon Paul Manafort before he leaves the White House.

      Like

  • Trump has asked Congress to repeal section 230 and they had a chance. Were I Trump, I would veto the legislation and allow Congress to tell us that the leftists banning their enemies from social media is just peachy and see if the GOP in Congress rises to the bait.

    Liked by 1 person

  • The whole point is that in reality, they will be less eager to use censorship to combat fake news.

    Now, if Trump says something like (he did) “you can get rid of corona by injecting bleach”, Twitter could be sued if people would try.
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/amp/world-us-canada-52407177

    The law makes tech companies no longer legally responsible for the things their users post, so they don’t have worry about liability anymore (at least not in the U.S.)

    So it is only in Trump’s favour, as he will no longer bring Twitter at jeopardy if he spreads misinformation.

    Furthermore, it is ridiculous that the most important bill of the U.S., important for the nations security and the jobs of millions of people, are in danger because one toddler that will only be in office for 2 months, is whining about some disclaimer on Twitter when he posts some bullshit.

    Like

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